Snoo Wilson Scriptwriting Prize 2017

We are delighted to announce the winners of the Snoo Wilson Scriptwriting Prize, 2017 judged by Molly Naylor and Adam Taylor.

  • Undergraduate shortlist: Angie Peña-Arenas (Winner of the undergraduate category) – Oiga, Mire, Vea (Screenplay) and Eleanor Daymond – Glawen (stageplay)
  • PG Shortlist: Iain Gonoude (Winner of the postgraduate category) – Cherrypicking (Stageplay) and Ann Yuu Engebretsen – Aireborne (Screenplay)

The Prize seeks to reward the most inventive, imaginative and formally achieved piece of scriptwriting as a dissertation by an Undergraduate or Postgraduate student in the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. Each student received £250. In 2018, the Prize will be extended to scriptwriting students in the School of Art, Media and American Studies.

The prizes were awarded at a ceremony held at The Garage in Norwich on 31 January 2018. UEA Drama students gave excellent performances of readings of extracts from each of the shortlisted scripts before the winner was announced by judges Molly Naylor (scriptwriter and performer) and Adam Taylor (The Garage in Norwich).

Also in attendance were members of Snoo Wilson’s family and friends, and an invited audience of students/ and families of the shortlisted entrants.

The late Snoo Wilson read American Studies at UEA and was taught by the author and literary critic, Malcolm Bradbury. He graduated in 1969 and began his writing career in the same year. He was one of a handful of playwrights who reinvented British theatre in the 1970’s and 80’s. More About Snoo Wilson.

The Snoo Wilson Archive was gifted to the British Archive for Contemporary Writing in 2015 and the Faculty of Humanities kindly funds the prize which acknowledges Snoo’s legacy.

 

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Archive Exhibition: Identity, Memory and Legacy in Suffragette History

 

The archives of leading working class suffragettes, Annie Kenney and Jessie Kenney, are held at the University of East Anglia (UEA) as ‘The Kenney Papers’ and include diaries, memorabilia and original correspondence from leading political figures, including Lady Constance Lytton, Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst. To celebrate the lives of these extraordinary women and the centenary of partial suffrage in 1918, a small display is on show during 2018 at UEA Library’s Archives Foyer (Floor 02), and available to the public. The archive itself is publicly accessible Mon-Fri by prior appointment e: archives@uea.ac.uk p: 01603 59 3491.

A project to digitise material from the archive as part of an online exhibition is also underway and material is being loaned to the Kenney sisters’ home town in Oldham as part of an exhibition at Oldham Gallery.

About the Kenney sisters

Annie Kenney (1879-1953) worked in a cotton mill from the age of 10. In 1905 she was recruited to the cause of women’s suffrage after hearing Mrs Pankhurst and her daughters addressing an open-air meeting in Manchester. On the 13th October 1905 she carried out what is now recognised as the first militant act of the suffrage movement when she accompanied Christabel Pankhurst to an election meeting in Manchester Free Trade Hall and heckled the speakers, Sir Edward Grey and Winston Churchill. She and Christabel were arrested and imprisoned. Thereafter Annie Kenney was a leading figure in the Women’s Social and Political Union (WSPU), the organisation founded by Emmeline Pankhurst in 1903.

Jessie Kenney (1887-1985) was Annie’s younger sister. She was Secretary of the WSPU and worked alongside Christabel Pankhurst in Paris from 1912, assisting in the long-range operations of WSPU. In 1917, she accompanied Emmeline Pankhurst to Russia, on behalf of the British government to promote the mobilisation of Russian women in the war effort. Jessie was in Russia for some three months and made a detailed record of events. Unpublished memoirs within the archive reveal fascinating insights into the movement and the legacy of the Kenney sisters.

Link to the Kenney Papers’ Archive page