Exploring the Archives: a monthly update: October 2017

Opening of 195 new Library study spaces & Research Collections refurbishment

062This opening ceremony was performed by Vice-Chancellor David Richardson on 10 October. As well as celebrating the improvements in the Library building, he used his speech to highlight developments within the British Archive for Contemporary Writing (BACW). Attendees included staff and contractors. Tours of the refurbished areas and new study areas followed the opening ceremony.

UEA Open Day, 21 October

Parents and prospective applicants to the Faculty of Humanities (HUM) attended presentations on the BACW as part of their Open Day tour. They were also provided with access to materials from the Archive and were given insight into how we use these resources within teaching.

Teaching sessions in the Archives

• Research Methodologies Seminar 
Research Methodology in Literature and the Visual Arts: Building an Archive. This session aimed to engage post-graduate students with some of the challenges and questions that working with archives begins to throw up, connecting theoretical approaches with practical archival activities. It was hoped that they would be encouraged to reflect on the process of building their own archive as a researcher, probing the complex relationship between subjectivity and objectivity in what they are doing.

• MA in Biography & Creative Non-Fiction (LDC – Literature, Drama & Creative Writing)
DSCF3073An introduction to the BACW and an opportunity to explore a variety of papers belonging to individuals. This included fascinating & revealing letters from Doris Lessing; an unpublished manuscript and Russian diary by Jessie Kenney (suffragette); detailed field notebooks belonging to nature writer Roger Deakin along with chapter drafts of Waterlog; correspondence from Lorna Sage’s archive along with the manuscript of Bad Blood; correspondence of the publisher Charles Pick which revealed a particularly personal involvement with the authors; and personal letters of J.D. Salinger in which the students noted his sense of humour.

Unboxed (LDC students contributing to the Archives blog)

Three introductory sessions to the Unboxed project were held on 31 October. Interested LDC students learnt more about this opportunity, what’s expected and how they might like to contribute. There are three pathways to get involved: blogging, digitisation or in researching Archive content. This year we are particularly keen to highlight the Kenney Papers (suffragettes), though students are free to choose from across the collections.

Charles Pick (Publisher)

An overseas PhD candidate has traced useful trade figures for the publication of the Loeb Classical Library. The LCL was published by Heinemann until the late 1980s.

Kenney Papers (Suffragettes)

Students taking the MA in Gender Studies module were introduced to the Kenney papers. They were fortunate to have a discussion with a biographer and researcher who is currently working on the papers and who has already published a biography of another suffragette, Lady Constance Lytton. Jessie Kenney’s unpublished autobiography, The Price of Liberty, provides insight into how the suffragettes viewed the struggle many years later. Also of interest are the influences and implications of the Kenney family’s working class background

Malcolm Bradbury Archive

An overseas visiting academic in LDC is looking at published press-cuttings and journal articles by and about Bradbury (former Creative Writing Professor at UEA).

Pritchard Papers

PP.18.4.4.5

Copyright  Pritchard Papers

Users of this collection have been interested in architects and designers, and in the 1930s branding of the Isokon Furniture Company.

UEA Collection

• A PhD student from an overseas university is looking at the interior design and feel of the Sainsbury Centre for Visual Arts (SCVA) as well as the visitor experience.

• Recordings from UEA’s former Audio-Visual Services relating to the palaeopathologist Calvin Wells have been traced to the East Anglian Film Archive (EAFA).

Zuckerman Archive (Chief Scientific Adviser)

• A PhD Associate Professor from a US university has visited to research the activities of the Tots and Quots (a left-of-centre dining club for the discussion of science and society) which included Cyril Darlington, J.B.S. Haldane, J.D. Bernal, Solly Zuckerman, and others.

• Another US PhD Fellow visited to research papers on nuclear weapons and defence. He was particularly struck by the depth of the correspondence we hold on Richard Garwin (American Physicist and designer of the first hydrogen bomb).

Special Collections

UEAContemporaryWritingArchiveLR 134• There were 16 requests.
• Seminar: Reading the 18th Century Novel (LDC for Y3 Undergraduates).

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Documentation re British Architecture of the 1950s and 1960s

The papers assembled by Prof. Stefan Muthesius over 25 years relate closely to three of the researcher’s books: Tower Block. Modern Public Housing in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (with Miles Glendinning, Yale University Press 1994); The Post-War University. Utopianist Campus and College (Yale University Press 1999); and Concrete and Open Skies. Architecture at the University of East Anglia (with Peter Dormer, Unicorn Press 2004).

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Copyright Clive Darra

In this post we have asked Muthesius (creator and depositor of the papers), to help us draw out the collection’s strengths and potential value to researchers.

The three publications all concern British (and in the case of the Yale University book also foreign) architecture of the 1940s to the 1970s. The material in the archive consists of copies of some unprinted archival material of the period (Ministry papers), of extracts from books, pamphlets and ministerial publications, many of them obscure and hard to get hold of, but principally of extracts from the periodical press of the period in question. While some material from the very major journals may be available on-line, the many lesser periodicals which are massive and which contain the bulk of the detailed information are unlikely to ever be scanned. These extracts have been culled from diverse libraries and have been filed here under both subject and place. The value of these files lies precisely in the fact that nowhere else can one easily find assembled information about a certain building, in this case a housing estate, or a university. Such information is often far ‘better’ than what one could gain from a visit to a local library or archive.

UEA.PHO.4.20

Copyright University of East Anglia

As British architecture of the 1950s and 1960s is now receiving very much more interest than during the 1990s and the 2000nds, the collection will attract more interest, too. The collection relating to UEA (a campus with examples of brutalist buildings from the 60s) likewise contains material that cannot be accessed anywhere else.

Please contact the Archives should you wish to arrange access to the papers.

A guide to Stefan Muthesius’ Papers held in UEA Archives

Photo: Clive Darra (Creative commons license)

The Suffragettes and two World Wars: Letters from Christabel Pankhurst to Annie Kenney

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Annie Kenney (left); Christabel Pankhurst – c1905-1912 Source: The Women’s Library collection, London School of Economics

An Unboxed blog from Yaiza Canopoli, undergraduate of the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing.

Related blog, Annie Kenney and Christabel Pankhurst, arrested at the Free Trade Hall on October 13, 1905.

Christabel Pankhurst was born into a family of fighters for women’s rights. Her mother, Emmeline Pankhurst, was the leader of the suffragette movement, and she taught her daughter from early on to fight for her rights. Christabel wrote many letters to fellow suffragettes after 1918, asking for opinions on their legacy and treatment and voicing her own; two particularly interesting letters are addressed to Annie Kenney, with whom she maintained a strong friendship long after the suffragette movement had quieted down and the two world wars were over. The letters are held at the University of East Anglia’s Archives as part of the Kenney Papers.

In a letter from January 1949, Christabel commemorates the death of Flora Drummond, nicknamed ‘the General’ for her habit of leading marches for women’s rights wearing a military uniform. This woman had been a grand figure in the movement, and her death caused sorrow for a lot of women who had been involved at the time.

The idea that the movement is over, that ‘[a] chapter has closed’, and that there is nothing more to be done, seems to be a recurring thought in Christabel’s letters. In 1946 she writes

[t]he vote is ours, and that is what matters,

and then in 1949 she repeats herself, adding that:

it is for the younger women to use it wisely

This is in response to multiple requests for publications focusing on the suffragette movement; in 1946 she was asked to participate in the making of a movie recounting the women’s struggle for the vote, and then in 1949 a similar request was put forward regarding the writing of a book. In both cases, she refused to take part, saying that with the world in such a fragile state as it was left in after the Second World War, showing the way the British government had responded to the women’s rights movement would only put more pressure on Britain and create further tensions:

for foreigners who see the film may get an erroneous impression of what England is today and judge her present case by that blotted page in our history

This awareness of more than just women’s rights is very present throughout most of the suffragettes’ correspondence with one another. When the First World War broke out, the suffragette movement was put on hold to help the government with this international struggle, and even after both wars were over, the women who had been part of the movement were still careful about putting the national and international situation before their own fight. Another example of this is a book that Christabel had written before these requests were voiced; she had already put it in the hands of a publisher when she decided to call off the deal because of the upcoming Second World War.

Ultimately, both letters are about war and memory. As much as they talk about writing books and making movies, the theme of the two world wars is present throughout the correspondence, and the weight these experiences have put on Christabel is palpable. The suffragettes fought for their own rights, but first and foremost they fought for equality and freedom, and the wars of the 20th Century brought these two concepts to their limits, uniting the militant women and the government in what was ultimately a fight for human rights.

The letters exchanged between Christabel Pankhurst and Annie Kenney can be accessed at UEA, alongside other fascinating correspondence between various suffragettes.

[KP/AK/1-2: correspondence with Christabel Pankhurst. Letter from 25/01/1949 + letter from 19/11/1946]

Kenney Papers at UEA Archives

How to access the Archives at UEA: https://portal.uea.ac.uk/library/archives

Exploring the Archives: a monthly update: September 2017

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LDC PGT students’ introduction to primary source archive materials

LDC PGT Induction

What constitutes distinctively graduate research and how might it differ from undergraduate study?
This seminar in the Archives Reading Room was attended by 12 postgraduates from the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing. Material from across Archives and Special Collections were used in demonstrating and drawing out the benefits as well as the unique challenges posed by primary source material and early printed works. Students had the opportunity to handle papers and in some cases listen to interviews from the archives of Naomi Alderman, Tash Aw, Richard Beard, Andrew Cowan, Adam Foulds, Annie Kenney, Doris Lessing, J.D. Salinger, W.G. Sebald and Snoo Wilson.

Lorna Sage Archive
A visiting researcher from Tokyo has been looking at records held in the Sage archive which relates to Angela Carter. This includes a catalogue of Carter’s private library.

Outreach

 Heritage Open Day / Kenney Papers, 8 September

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Medals and ribbons collected and worn by the suffragettes.

There were 11 attendees at this event held in the Archives Reading Room on 8 September. Guest speaker Fiona Sinclair (MA Creative Writing) spoke about her research on the Kenney Papers (suffragettes) in the Archives and how this links with the novel she is writing. There was also an introduction to the BACW (British Archive for Contemporary Writing) and visitors had a chance to see some exhibits and the stack area.

• UEA Open Day, 9 September
Parents and prospective applicants to the Faculty of Humanities attended presentations on the BACW as part of their Open Day tour. They were also provided with access to materials from the Archive and were given insight into how we use these resources within teaching.

• Exhibition: ‘Plotting the Perfect Crime’

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Exhibition on Floor 02 of the Library

For the second year, the BACW created a crime writing exhibition, as part of Noirwich, Crime Writing Festival organised by UEA in collaboration with The Writers’ Centre and Dead Good Books. 273 ticket holders for Martina Cole and Arne Dahl festival events on 15 September were given an exclusive preview of ‘Plotting the Perfect Crime’ exhibition in the Thomas Paine Study Centre Foyer. The exhibition, which features original archive material from Stuart MacBride, Val McDermid and Robert Edric, has now moved to the new Archive Foyer on 02 of the Library where it will be on display until Dec 22. More about the exhibition.

• I Love Arts and Humanities: Multimedia Experience, 26 & 29 September
As part of Transitions Week, this event in the HUM Media Suite on 26 September welcomed 150 people through the doors in the first 90 mins. Visitors were able to find out about the facilities in the Media Suite and talk to the BACW and the East Anglian Film Archive (EAFA) about volunteering opportunities. The event was repeated on 29 September.

• Arts and Humanities Opportunities Fair, 28 September
The Archives promoted ‘Unboxed’ at the fair held in the Council Chamber.  This is a blogging opportunity open to student volunteers who wish to explore and highlight treasures from the Archives and have their posts published on the UEA Archives blog.

UEA Collection

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1962 UEA Appeal Fund documents in clamshell box

Staff from the V-C’s Office visited the Archives to learn more about the UEA Collection and see a range of materials including papers relating to the 1962 UEA Appeal Fund.

Zuckerman Archive

• A researcher is working on reports relating to the bombing of northern Italian ports during WWII.

• A university academic has visited to research WWII casualty surveys conducted in Birmingham and Hull and a related collection of 2,000 school children’s essays giving their account of being in an air raid.

Special Collections
There were 8 requests.

Exploring the Archives: a monthly update: August 2017

Archives 08-2017 (2)The installation of new rolling stack near the Archives reached completion this month and we were able to re-open the Reading Room to users on 21 August. We thank users for their patience during the temporary disruption.

Doris Lessing
A visiting English Studies researcher from a Spanish university has been working on Lessing’s early deposits of correspondence and love letters.

H.H. Lamb Archive
An undergraduate from the US has spent a couple of days in the Archives.  Her research focuses on Hubert Lamb’s views of climate, particularly those which influenced his founding vision for the Climatic Research Unit, and the ways in which his perspectives on anthropogenic global warming have been explained and discussed in secondary sources.

An updated listing to the Lamb papers is now available.

Pritchard Papers
• A returning researcher and writer has visited to consult the papers on architecture, design and the thirties.
• A new resident of Lawn Road Flats has visited to find out more about the history of the flats, its Isobar restaurant and Half Hundred dining club. Philip Harben ran the Isobar in the late 1930s before becoming the UK’s first television cook (here he can be seen making a fondue at the flats’ 21st Anniversary in 1955. Among the flats’ many noteworthy early residents was the Austrian architect Egon Riss, designer of the Isokon Pocket Bottleship (1939).

Roger Deakin Archive
• A PhD candidate in the US has been sent notes made by Deakin on the topic of drowning. His dissertation investigates drowning in key texts of poetic realism.
• An Archivist from London has visited to research papers relating to Deakin’s book on wild swimming, Waterlog.

W.G. Sebald Audio-Visual Archive
A lecturer from Canada has expressed an interest in the Archives as he teaches from Sebald’s novel The Emigrants.

Zuckerman Archive
A number of SHAEF Bombing Analysis Unit reports have been scanned for a researcher in France. They include photographs and data concerning the effects of bombing around Le Havre during WWII. (SHAEF = Supreme Headquarters Allied Expeditionary Air Force).

Special Collections
There were 4 requests. Some drawings from our Special Collections can be seen on display at the Norfolk Record Office. Drawing in the Archive: the Visual Record of Norwich’s Medieval Churches 1700-2017 runs from 21 August – 17 November 2017.

Plotting the Perfect Crime: a crime writing exhibition from the British Archive for Contemporary Writing at UEA

Noirwichnoirwich logo

This year’s crime writing exhibition, created to coincide with Noirwich, reveals the intricate planning behind some of our greatest contemporary crime novels, with material from Val McDermid, Stuart MacBride and Robert Edric, author of a crime trilogy set in Hull, this year’s City of Culture. Stuart MacBride predicts a nosebleed amongst fellow writers.

Here archivist, Justine Mann, introduces her personal highlights.

Stuart MacBride

MacBride’s notebooks and mindmaps are the earliest incarnation of his novels. He has created a literal map to visualise his fictional town of Old Castle, all the better to locate the murders and the distances between them. What begins as an impressive tool evolves into something the Ordnance Survey would be proud of and is published within a subsequent novel. Perhaps the most striking of elements within this display is a graph. At first glance it appears to be a chart of multiple, frantic, sound waves but on closer inspection it reveals the cadences of plot points marshalled to pinpoint accuracy in order to create the most devastating effect on the reader. He remarks casually, that ‘This has been known to give other writers nose bleeds’. This display also reveals his painstaking restructuring of the plot for In the Cold Dark Ground, scene by scene with scissors and sellotape.

Val McDermid

The author’s latest novel, Insidious Intent, ‘impeccably plotted and intensely gripping’ also began in notebook form. On display are original pages from a numbered outline charting key plot developments. ‘When I start a book, I have an idea of the story arc and I’ve spent most of my prep time thinking about the characters: how they’re going to conduct themselves, how they got to be the person they are today.’

The evidence here suggests that McDermid’s subconscious is working hard on plot design before she tackles the page. While crafting the language she refers to the outline notes to keep the structure on track. She recently revealed her daily routine to The Guardian:

‘Around the second cup of coffee, I take a look at what I last wrote, tweaking and revising, stripping the prose back till I’m more at ease with it. I spend the first month feeling my way into the book, getting a sense of its world and learning its nooks and crannies. Then it picks up pace and I can’t escape it.’

Robert Edric

How does a literary novelist take on the challenge of writing crime fiction? In 2002, the Booker longlisted author, Robert Edric, took a break from writing literary novels, to create a crime trilogy set in Hull, this year’s City of Culture. In The Times, Neel Mukherjee, applauded Cradle Song, Edric’s first, for: “its vertiginously devious plot twists, the maze of multiple-crossings (which) all close like a fist around the throat of the reader.”

“When I’m working on a literary novel,” Edric says, “it’s less important to me whether I write a, then d, g , x then e. The meaning of the book might be in the middle. The goal is not the end, but whether it fails or succeeds in your own mind. With a crime novel, you’re less organic. There has to be a logical process.’

A sense of place has always been important to Edric and in the opening chapter on display he uses Spurn Point, a bleak yet beautiful peninsular, 30 miles from Hull and ravaged on all sides by the North Sea, as the setting of a key meeting between ex copper, Sullivan, and private investigator, Rivers. The drafts reveal the key phrases and striking images that survive, almost in tact, from first draft through to final publication, as well as the tweaks and line edits that heighten characterisation and plot tension.

Previewed on Friday 15 September (UEA, TPSC Foyer) /

UEA Archives Foyer, UEA Library Floor 02, Tue 19 Sept – Fri 22 Dec (Free access)

Exploring the Archives: a monthly update: July 2017

Library Space Project
During a temporary closure period the Archives office has been operating from the Silent Reading Room on Floor 02. This arrangement is expected to continue until Friday 18 August.

Further details of Archives closure and the Library Space Project.

Summary of Teaching Sessions and Seminars held within the British Archive for Contemporary Writing (BACW) during academic Year 2016/17 and drawing on archive material in our collections

Total participants 2016/17 = 132
72 students were undergraduates and 60 postgraduates
This represents a 78% increase on the previous year 2015/16.

Sessions took place with literature, creative writing and media students and involved a wide range of archive collections, with material selected and tailored for relevance to their module. Students were introduced to archive handling skills and the process of archive research. Satisfaction levels were very high with 99% of students reporting that the session was very good or good and 97% reporting that it was relevant to their module. 98% of students said they felt encouraged to visit the Archive independently.

FLY 2017
As part of Fly 2017 – the Literary Festival for Young People – A BACW led workshop took place with the Norfolk Record Office and UEA author and lecturer, Rachel Hore, on using archives as inspiration for creative writing. Year 10, Year 12 and 13 students were introduced to original archive material and shown how to use collections as writing prompts to generate story ideas, as well as to flesh out character and historical setting. Students read and shared passages inspired by the Kenney Papers suffragette archives.

UEA Open days

UEA Open day 2017-148_Steve Wright Photography Limited

Steve Wright Photography Ltd

During UEA Open Days 7 and 8 July – there were exhibitions of archive material and talks on how the BACW contributes to undergraduate academic teaching and research at UEA and the ways in which students have become involved in our Unboxed project.

Permissions/copyright
A flurry of requests has been received for permission to quote or publish from the Pritchard and Zuckerman Archives. Mostly these are submitted from former users and visitors who are nearing the end of a long research or writing project. We are delighted to receive these requests as they confirm the research value of the collections, opening them up to a wider audience and to further interpretation. While we don’t hold copyright for much of the content we can usually provide a good steer on who to contact.

Doris Lessing Archive
A request for Lessing’s 1940s love letters to John Whitehorn has come from an overseas scholarly writer on Lessing.

J.D. Salinger – Hartog Letters

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J.D. Salinger – Hartog Letters

We were asked to verify a signature in a book held by a collector. As the letters we hold are all only informally signed ‘Jerry’ we were unable to confirm.

Kenney Papers (suffragettes)
We received a copyright enquiry for Annie Kenney’s published memoir Memories of a Militant (1924).

Pritchard Papers

PP.16.2.30.56.3.1955

Lawn Road Flats London, 1955

A new resident of Lawn Road Flats has arranged a visit to read the Papers. The Archives has welcomed a steady stream of residents who are curious about the 1930s history of the iconic building which they now call home.

Special Collections
12 requests.

How iconic designer Cecil Beaton put theatrical flair into the UEA’s graduation gown

Portrait of Cecil Beaton (1985) by Hugo Vickers

Vickers, Hugo: Cecil Beaton (1985)

An Unboxed blog from Isabel Hassan, School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia.

In 1965 Cecil Beaton was approached by Vice-Chancellor Frank Thistlethwaite to design the academic dress for the new University of East Anglia’s first graduation. Beaton introduced the use of indigo blue gowns at UEA, whereas other universities up and down the country had mostly opted for the traditional black.

Cecil Beaton was, amongst other things, an Academy Award-winning stage and costume designer for films and the theatre. Prior to designing the UEA graduation gowns, he had worked on Broadway designing costumes.

Beaton thought that the graduation gowns needed to be more theatrical; if you had worked hard to get a degree, you should be able to dress up and flaunt yourself a little on the day you receive that degree.

The cost of Beaton’s indigo blue graduation gown was £2 in 1966, increasing to £4 in 1970. Current university students may think this is affordable, but £4 in 1970 would today be worth £43.26 which is only slightly cheaper than the current £50 cost for UEA students. However, in 1970 “only 20 of the 2,500 students there [at UEA] have thought it worth paying £4 for the dark-blue gowns.”

UEA Coll 4. Original bachelors hat The Dan Dare

Source: Nicholas Groves’ ‘The Academical Dress of UEA’

One aspect of Beaton’s design which did not catch on was his suggestion for novel graduation caps. According to Nicholas Groves’ The Academical Dress of UEA, Beaton wanted to “abandon the traditional square cap (mortar-board) [ . . . ] and to invent a special hat for bachelors, and another for masters.” This hat was more rounded in shape and was called the ‘Dan Dare’ (pictured). The design was a result of Beaton’s desire to make the entire graduation look more theatrical. However, Groves admits that “they proved unable to withstand popular opinion, and have been replaced by the traditional square.”

Although the Dan Dare may not have prevailed, the indigo-blue graduation gowns have. This is interesting considering that UEA students in 1970 did not think the indigo-blue gowns were worth paying for, and now they are almost iconic at UEA.

2017 will see another year of UEA students graduate in these blue gowns from 17th – 21st July.

Notes
1. A major problem of the indigo gowns was that, over the years, the cloth used grew gradually lighter in colour, until by the mid-1990s it was almost air-force blue. It has since returned to a darker shade (Nicholas Groves. The Academical Dress of the University of East Anglia, 2005).
2. The undergraduates were given a short knee-length cape rather than a gown, with slits for the passage of the arms. The colour is recorded as smokey blue (Michael Sanderson. The History of the University of East Anglia, 2002) and as indigo (Groves, ibid).

Plywood: Material of the Modern World

This exhibition opens at the Victoria and Albert Museum on 15 July 2017. ‘Featuring groundbreaking pieces by Alvar Aalto, Marcel Breuer and Charles and Ray Eames, alongside an incredible range of objects from planes to skateboards, this exhibition tells the story of how this often-overlooked material made the modern world.’

On display from UEA Archives are printed designs showing plywood profiles for railway carriages. These were produced by Estonian furniture maker A.M. Luther Ltd, circa 193? They form part of the Pritchard Papers, an archive rich in the history and development of the use of plywood in furniture making.

Plywood in the Pritchard Papers

Jack Pritchard began producing plywood furniture from 1933. The first products were modular shelf units designed by Wells Coates and manufactured by Venesta (Pritchard’s then employer). Venesta was a useful introduction to the industry, with its factories in Estonia, Latvia and Finland. A couple of years later Pritchard set up Isokon Furniture Company. They marketed the designs of other companies such as Finmar and PEL, and with the arrival of European designers Marcel Breuer and Walter Gropius expanded their own range of furniture with a particular emphasis on plywood. Marcel Breuer’s Long Chair was a resounding success and is still manufactured today by Isokon Plus.

Other noteworthy items include Egon Riss’ Penguin Donkey book-case and Bottleship, both re-designed after the War by Ernest Race; and Breuer’s nesting tables.

Pritchard not only worked with plywood but he also surrounded himself with it at home. He and his wife Molly built the iconic Lawn Road Flats in Hampstead, London. A block of flats built for minimalist living, complete with built-in wardrobes, modular shelf units, nifty partitions, and a love of all things light and portable which facilitated an unencumbered lifestyle. Plywood did all of this. The Isokon flats are now grade I listed and include a gallery celebrating the buildings’ history, including the history of its members’ only Isobar restaurant.

A search for ‘plywood’ in the catalogue delivers over 200 results. It includes patents; details of the supply of furniture and raw products; customer orders; sales; correspondence; and Pritchard’s 1939 lecture ‘Design in Plywood’. Here he highlights the qualities of plywood, and the opportunities which arise when making full use of its “natural whippiness and springiness”, most evident in a new area of development involving the creation of built-up timber. He refers to Breuer’s Long Chair as being the greatest achievement in the use of plywood to date.

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Photographs: Pritchard Papers, University of East Anglia.

Pritchard Papers and online guide
Isokon Gallery
Marcel Breuer Digital Archive
Plywood exhibition at the V&A

If you would like to know more about the collection please contact archives@uea.ac.uk

Exploring the Archives: a monthly update: June 2017

In June, Archives staff settled into the Silent Reading Room just along the corridor and we expect to be here for several weeks. Refurbishment work continues on Floor 02 and the builders have gone to great lengths in safeguarding our equipment and the collections, even installing temporary walls and doors.

Further details on the temporary closure of Archives.


BACW

  • UEA students have been consulting Tash Aw’s Archive and Doris Lessing’s correspondence.
  • 10 PhD students of creative writing, literature, history, languages and linguistics attended our joint British Archive for Contemporary Writing and East Anglian Film Archives workshop at the CHASE Encounters Conference  held at UEA on 29 and 30 June.The workshop highlighted the opportunities and challenges of using film and literary Archive material for research and teaching, as well as the day to day role of the Archivist and the future challenge for archives in managing born digital material.

    Students were provided with hands on access to copies of unique archive material to help simulate the process of independent archive research. This provoked some interesting discussion, particularly amongst creative writers who were prompted to consider their own archive material.

Kenney Papers (Suffragettes)
• We are preparing materials for an external exhibition to be held in 2018/19.
• The collection is being used by a writer as the basis for her work of fiction.

Pritchard Papers
One user is researching for a book on Lawn Road Flats and artists of the 1930s; another is writing a book on art, design and science.

Other enquiries related to the Pritchard family tree; and to Walter Gropius’ farewell dinner guest list from 1937.

Roger Deakin

ShepherdsHutSummer

The shepherd’s hut to which Deakin refers in The Garden. Copyright Estate of Roger Deakin

Users are reminded that the BBC recording of Cigarette on the Waveney is publicly available online (a tranquil documentary of Deakin’s trip down the River Waveney in a white canoe). For UEA members, his recordings of The House and The Garden are available on Box of Broadcasts.

UEA Collection
Malcolm Bradbury’s large magazine and newspaper archive has been accessed by a visiting academic in LDC (School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing).

Zuckerman Archive
The collection has been accessed for the correspondence of Lord Zuckerman, Lord Mountbatten and Margaret Thatcher; and for architectural drawings of German and Italian buildings held within WWII bombing reports.

Special Collections
RauschenbergA valuable addition to the collection has been a limited facsimile edition of Robert Rauschenberg‘s 34 illustrations after Dante’s Inferno. Produced by New York’s Museum of Modern Art and presented in a grey clothbound clamshell box, it includes the trade publication. Rauschenberg’s series of drawings from 1958–60 are each reproduced at actual size on individual sheets; a drawing for each Canto of Dante’s poem. A copy of the trade publication is on order for the Library’s open shelves.

There were 12 enquiries for Special Collections.